Developing an Understanding of Moral Injury in Business Settings Summary

Developing an Understanding of Moral Injury in Business Settings Summary

Moral injury refers to the lasting strong cognitive and emotional response that is caused by performing, witnessing, or failing to prevent an action that violates one's own moral beliefs and expectations (Litz et al., 2009; 2019). Typically, moral injury research has been conducted within military settings, and more recently within healthcare. The outcomes of moral injury explored in the literature range from psychological (such as intrusive thoughts, changes in cognition for instance feeling unwanted and unworthy), emotional (such as shame, guilt, and disgust), social (such as social withdrawal) and behavioural (such as avoidance and anger). Experience of these symptoms will not in themselves lead to mental health issues, but if the symptoms continue for a long time, or are repeatedly experienced, moral injury will be an outcome (Litz & Kerig, 2019). This research answers repeated calls for more evidence to understand the extent of the moral stress and injury problem within other occupations (e.g., Williamson et al., 2018; Ewen et al., 2021).

This research aimed to:

  • Develop an understanding of the experience of moral stress and injury within business settings
  • Examine the antecedents, mediators and moderators of moral stress and injury within business settings
  • Examine the outcomes of moral injury within business settings (including links with burnout)

The creation of this report was sponsored by Cara de Lange of Softer Success.

Developing an Understanding of Moral Injury in Business Settings Summary

Date Published
Mon, 30 May 2022
Publisher
Affinity Health at Work
Author
Lewis, R., Agate, C., Nielsen, K., Yarker, J.
Reference
Lewis, R., Agate, C., Nielsen, K., & Yarker, J. (2022). Developing an understanding of moral injury in business settings Summary. London: Affinity Health at Work.
Categories
Keywords
Stress, Trauma, Mental Health, Organisational Culture, Psychological Impact, Psychosocial Risk, Resilience

Moral injury refers to the lasting strong cognitive and emotional response that is caused by performing, witnessing, or failing to prevent an action that violates one's own moral beliefs and expectations (Litz et al., 2009; 2019). Typically, moral injury research has been conducted within military settings, and more recently within healthcare. The outcomes of moral injury explored in the literature range from psychological (such as intrusive thoughts, changes in cognition for instance feeling unwanted and unworthy), emotional (such as shame, guilt, and disgust), social (such as social withdrawal) and behavioural (such as avoidance and anger). Experience of these symptoms will not in themselves lead to mental health issues, but if the symptoms continue for a long time, or are repeatedly experienced, moral injury will be an outcome (Litz & Kerig, 2019). This research answers repeated calls for more evidence to understand the extent of the moral stress and injury problem within other occupations (e.g., Williamson et al., 2018; Ewen et al., 2021).

This research aimed to:

  • Develop an understanding of the experience of moral stress and injury within business settings
  • Examine the antecedents, mediators and moderators of moral stress and injury within business settings
  • Examine the outcomes of moral injury within business settings (including links with burnout)

The creation of this report was sponsored by Cara de Lange of Softer Success.

Did you find this report useful? Yes / No 3 people found this useful.