Women Directors On FTSE Company Boards: An Exploration Of The Factors Influencing Their Appointment

Women Directors On FTSE Company Boards: An Exploration Of The Factors Influencing Their Appointment

This study provides analysis and insight into the views and experiences of 12 top executives of FTSE 350 companies about appointing women to their boards, against background growth in the number of female non-executive directors but the number of female executive director appointments showing no progress. Findings showed that the idea of women on boards as non-executive directors is well embedded, yet many barriers to increasing the numbers of women executive directors remain. Lack of robust selection processes, negative views of executive search companies, and views about the shortage of suitably qualified women are reported while most participants did not view the development of the female executive pipeline as a top priority. Findings suggest that public focus on increasing the number of non-executive directors has been effective, attention should be shifted to galvanise efforts in FTSE companies to develop their female talent and increase executive director numbers.

Women Directors On FTSE Company Boards: An Exploration Of The Factors Influencing Their Appointment

Date Published
Tue, 01 Jan 2019
Publisher
Cogent Psychology
Reference
Barnes, C., Lewis, R., Wiley, L., Yarker, J. (2019). Women directors on FTSE company boards: an exploration of the factors influencing their appointment. Cogent Psychology. Volume 6 Issue 1
Website
https://doi.org/10.1080/23311908.2019.1691848
Categories
Keywords
Women, Female Executives, Barriers, Development

This study provides analysis and insight into the views and experiences of 12 top executives of FTSE 350 companies about appointing women to their boards, against background growth in the number of female non-executive directors but the number of female executive director appointments showing no progress. Findings showed that the idea of women on boards as non-executive directors is well embedded, yet many barriers to increasing the numbers of women executive directors remain. Lack of robust selection processes, negative views of executive search companies, and views about the shortage of suitably qualified women are reported while most participants did not view the development of the female executive pipeline as a top priority. Findings suggest that public focus on increasing the number of non-executive directors has been effective, attention should be shifted to galvanise efforts in FTSE companies to develop their female talent and increase executive director numbers.

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